Poppy & Rememberance

District Poppy Chairman – TBA

Vice Chair – TBA

This year at Sunnybrook Veterans ‘K’ Wing – Living Veteran’s Wall, a photo was take with The Lieutenant Governor Elizabeth Dowdeswell along with members of the Legion. In the Warriors Hall  the Presentation of the first Poppy for 2018 by The Provincial President, Sharon McKoewen.

From Left to Right: Linda Simone (President Branch 345), Mike Turner, Vic Sing (District Poppy Chair), Shelly Sing (District ‘D’ Commander), Her Honour Elizabeth Dowdeswell (Lieutenant Governor), Sharon McKoewon (Provincial President, Ontario Command), Kevin McLean (Sunnybrook Representative), Lisa Dinsmore (Staff Member, Ontario Command)

The Lieutenant Governor Elizabeth Dowdeswell is presented the first Poppy for 2018  by Provincial President, Sharon McKoewen and a Sunnybrook Korean Veteran.

2017 – Poppy Presentation at Sunnybrook Hospital

This year at Sunnybrook Veterans ‘K’ Wing – Living Veteran’s Wall, a photo was take with The Lieutenant Governor Elizabeth Dowdeswell along with members of the Legion. In the Warriors Hall  the Presentation of the first Poppy for 2017 by The Provincial President, Sharon McKoewen.

From Left to Right: Vic Sing (District Poppy Chair), Doug MacNeil (president, Branch 31), Mario Fioroni (1st Vice president, Branch 31), Sharon McKoewon (Provincial President, Ontario Command), Buck Buchanan (Vice president, Ontario Command), Her Honour Elizabeth Dowdeswell (Lieutenant Governor). Wayne Powell (Deputy District D Commander), Lisa Dinsmore (Staff Member, Ontario Command), Walter Vaughan (2nd Deputy District D Commander), Shelley Sing (District D Commander)

2016 – Remembrance Act Week at Queens Park

Today at Queen’s Park, Members of Provincial Parliament (MPP) unanimously passed the Remembrance Week Act,2016  designating the week leading up to Remembrance Day as “Remembrance Week”. The bill was sponsored by MPP Jim Wilson (Simcoe-Grey), and co-sponsored by MPPs John Fraser (Ottawa South) and Cheri DiNovo (Parkdale-High Park).

Veterans and representatives from various organizations, including the Canadian Armed Forces, the Royal Canadian Legion (Ontario Command), Commissionaires Great Lakes, the Royal Canadian Military Institute, the Naval Club of Toronto, the Naval Association of Canada (Toronto branch), and Wounded Warriors were present to witness its passage.

Link to the video of the day and The official Bill 55 wording below the photograph:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZW2sE291tY.

District D is responsible for the entire City of Toronto and the municipalities that make up the former region of Metropolitan Toronto

For a list of all the City of Toronto Remembrances Day Ceremonies

Please click on this link: City of Toronto Remembrance Day Ceremonies

For a list of Community Organizations Remembrances Day Ceremonies

Please click on this link: Community Organizations Remembrances Day Ceremonies


History of the Poppy

Why was the Poppy chosen as the symbol of remembrance for Canada’s war dead? The poppy, an international symbol for those who died in war, also had international origins.

A writer first made the connection between the poppy and battlefield deaths during the Napoleonic wars of the early 19th century, remarking that fields that were barren before battle exploded with the blood-red flowers after the fighting ended. Prior to the First World War few poppies grew in Flanders. During the tremendous bombardments of that war the chalk soils became rich in lime from rubble, allowing ‘popaver rhoeas’ to thrive.

When the war ended the lime was quickly absorbed, and the poppy began to disappear again. Lieut-Col. John McCrae, the Canadian doctor who wrote the poem IN FLANDERS FIELDS, made the same connection 100 years later, during the First World War, and the scarlet poppy quickly became the symbol for soldiers who died in battle.

Three years later an American, Moina Michael, was working in a New York City YMCA canteen when she started wearing a poppy in memory of the millions who died on the battlefield.

During a 1920 visit to the United States a French woman, Madame Guerin, learned of the custom. On her return to France she decided to use handmade poppies to raise money for the destitute children in war-torn areas of the country. In November 1921, the first poppies were distributed in Canada.

Thanks to the millions of Canadians who wear the flowers each November, the little red plant has never died and neither have Canadian’s memories for 117,000 of their countrymen who died in battle.

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